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Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
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World developers and game coders needed!
Submitted By Quantum on 12/12/10
Mars Explorer, Quantum, Documents 
This Document originally posted in the "Mars Explorer" Group

Hello, I have been having these ideas about the future versions of Marsxplr. In the current game, gravity is represented as a constant acceleration in the downwards direction. In the real world, this doesn't happen. Sure, if you are standing in the middle of a flat surface on Earth, the gravity is pointing down. However, we know that the earth is spherical. If the current physics of marsxplr was on earth, we would either need a flat Earth in order for everything to be normal. If there was a spherical Earth, you would fall off of it if you went anywhere a bit too far from the top of it.

My idea involves gravity fields, where the origin of gravity is at a point, and wherever you are, there is always a straight line to it, and that will be the direction of the gravity. This would allow people on one side of a sphere to stay on the world, and people on the other side to stay on, as well. This is exactly like the way we have on Earth! If we had this, we would have realistic worlds to an even greater extent, and, here's another cool thing... We would be able to send ourselves into orbit!
 
If we were to implement this, I would suggest starting out with a sphere. With that sphere, if it was perfectly spherical, you wuld set the origin of gravity at the center of the sphere, where the distance from the radius of the sphere would be zero.
 
Now, in the laws of gravity, we know that the strength of gravity decreases with distance, that is a well known fact. If you were to be on the surface, you would experience a stronger pull than if you were 2000 meters above the surface. If you managed to stay inside the middle of the sphere, you would just stay there. However, this is a really complicated matter, and essentially, we won't be creating planets, we will just be creating weak black holes in the game, but that's all right, as long as you make sure no object can get a certain distance to the center.
Now, the equation for determining the force between two objects is this:
 
F=G(m1m2)/r^2
 
F is the force. G is the gravitational constant which even I don't know how it was derived, but it is 6.67x10^-11. M1 could be one of the masses that you choose, since the force of gravity is actually the force between two objects. So, let's say that m1 could be the planet, and m2 could be the buggy. The distance is r, so you can say that gravity decreases proportionally with the square of the distance.
 
Now that you know the force, you have to figure out the acceleration. This would require the buggy to have a set mass, and the planet to have a set mass.
 
Once you have the masses, and you know the force, you apply it to the equation F=ma. To figure out the acceleration of the buggy, which is what we would call the gravity of the planet in m/s^2, you divide by m, and then you get the acceleration for that distance.
 
The reason why I ask for the limits of the size of a world is that we want this to be sort of realistic. Sort of large worlds would be nice for spheres, because you want to be able to see a bit down the road, with a horizon that is sort of far off.
 
Well, let's apply this.
 
Let's say we are able to make a world with a radius of about 5000 meters. We want it to resemble the Earth's gravity for normality, and the Earth's gravity is usually around 9.807 m/s^2 at the surface.
 
Now, we have to set a mass for the buggy, so let's say it is 1000 kg, just for the sake of the mathematics.
 
To have an acceleration of 9.807 m/s^2 for the buggy, we use the F=ma equation, and we multiply the mass of the buggy by the acceleration of gravity we want, and if we do that, we get 9807 Newton, or 9807 N. Now, let's plug that into the first equation I gave you,
F=G(m1m2)/r^2
9807=(6.67x10^-11)(m1)(1000)/(5000)^2
 
We know everything except for the mass of the planet. We know that is has a radius of 5000 meters, we know that the buggy has a mass of 1000 kg, we know that the gravitational constant, G, or "Big G" is 6.67x10^-11, and we know that the force needed to accelerate the buggy downwards at that rate at that altitude is 9807 N.
 
So, lets solve.
 
9807 times the square of the radius, which is 5000^2, or 25,000,000, is 245,175,000,000, or in scientific notation, 2.45175x10^11.
 
We now have 2.45175x10^11=G(m1)(1000)
 
Divide by 1000, or 10^3, and you get 2.45175x10^8=G(m1)
 
Divide by G, which is 6.67x10^-11, and you get that the mass of m1, or the planet world that we have created with a radius of 5000 meters is approximately 3.676x10^18 kg.
 
Now, I believe what we have here is a very dense planet, lol.
 
I think that the equation for the volume of a sphere is (4πr^2)/3, with π being pi, or 3.14159265258... and so on, with the numbers going on infinitely many times...
 
So, lets figure out the volume of this sphere!
 
4π(5000^2)/3 is approximately 1.0472x10^8, so we can say that this is that many cubic meters. (3.676x10^18 kg)/(1.0472x10^8 cubic meters) is about 3.51x10^10 kg per cubic meter, or about 35 Billion 100 million kg per cubic meter! That is very very dense, compared with the Earth's average density of 5540 kg per cubic meter!
 
However, all of that talk about the density of this hypothetical planet with the gravitational acceleration of 9.807 m/s^2 at the surface is irrelevant, lol :) I just thought it would be cool to figure out!
 
Now, one of the AWESOME implication of spherical planets with gravity fields is that we can send ourselves into ORBIT!
 
The speed needed to orbit a planet is given by the square root of 2Gm/r, with everything in the square root. This is what we call the escape velocity, or the velocity that you need to stay in perfect orbit. If you go slower than this velocity, then you will hit the planet, at some point in time. If you go faster than the escape velocity, then that is what you will do, escape the reigns of the gravity, and at some speed fly away from the planet. Now, that is not to say that the planet will not have a gravitational effect on you, but you won't be bound to the planet or bound into an orbit.
 
Now, at what speed would we have to be driving on the surface of the planet to go into orbit?
 
Well, we plug what we know into the equation. This means that the square root of 2(6.67x10^-11)(3.676x10^18)/5000=An escape velocity of 313.1074 m/s, or 700.4 mph! So, if we were to be driving a buggy on the surface, we would need to be going at least 700.4 mph to go in orbit! And, this is possible in Mars 3, with the I/O Settings box.
 
Now, I will go into further detail about how to implement this, but I have just given you world designers and game coders something to chew on... How to implement this?
 
I will write the idea that Flynn has told me in the comments, but I just wanted to submit this, now.
 

» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 0:01 GMT
Someone tell me what went wrong with the format! I want this to look nice!
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
2 days - 6,069v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 2:00 GMT
Quantum,
 
I believe, due to the formatting error, that this was copied and pasted from another document. To change it into the format that Plexpedia uses, I would suggest trying to input this into the HTML section of the edit text section, and insert these commands:
 
<html>
<body>
[Text] - This is where you put the content of your document
</body>
</html>
 
I have not used HTML in a long time, so if anyone finds a better HTML code to use, please feel free to use it instead of mine. :)
 
I hope this works!
 
Apophis
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 2:37 GMT
Oi Apophis! I haven't seen you in a while.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 31,378v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 2:41 GMT
I survived up until "Hello, I have been having these ideas about the future versions of Marsxplr. In the current game, gravity is represented as a constant acceleration" then I just gave up. But really what's this about?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 3:08 GMT
Basically, imagine a bunch of spheres(4,000 to 6,000 circumfrence (Foxholes is 700 wide)) with their own gravitational pulls.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 3:53 GMT
Comment removed
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 4:17 GMT
I believe this is more complicated than it needs to be for a game. I'm sure the Unity engine can handle a lot of the physics calculations already. 
 
If not, these calculations can definitely be used. It'd be quite an interesting project!
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 15:14 GMT
One issue:

Unity terrains are not spheres. Would we make the world in blender?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
5 days - 10,809v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 16:06 GMT
Looks like we may need to... It will be hard to do it in Sketchup or Unity.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 21:37 GMT
Man this makes every world on mars impossible to use :0

Unless, could someone stretch the terrain with a script to make them round?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 23:22 GMT
Yes.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 21:37 GMT
BLENDER FTW
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 23:28 GMT
BLENDER WTF

(too complicated)
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/10 - 23:51 GMT
You may make a world with the surface area of the world if you want, but the resolution would be ATROCIOUS.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 31,378v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 0:26 GMT
Nothing personal but what if all that brain destroying math and stuff, what will it do? What does it prove? What does it even mean? What are you trying to do?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 0:37 GMT
I didn't even read it lol

:P
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 1:06 GMT
As I explained earlier, imagine a bunch of spheres(4,000 to 6,000 circumfrence (Foxholes is 700 wide)) with their own gravitational pulls.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 1:54 GMT
Basically, you can send yourself into orbit. I just want to see if anyone can make a simple sphere with a radius of about 1000 meters
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 1:58 GMT
I need one of the mods to fix this format, if they can!
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 3:07 GMT

Hello, I have been having these ideas about the future versions of Marsxplr. In the current game, gravity is represented as a constant acceleration in the downwards direction. In the real world, this doesn't happen. Sure, if you are standing in the middle of a flat surface on Earth, the gravity is pointing down. However, we know that the earth is spherical. If the current physics of marsxplr was on earth, we would either need a flat Earth in order for everything to be normal. If there was a spherical Earth, you would fall off of it if you went anywhere a bit too far from the top of it.

My idea involves gravity fields, where the origin of gravity is at a point, and wherever you are, there is always a straight line to it, and that will be the direction of the gravity. This would allow people on one side of a sphere to stay on the world, and people on the other side to stay on, as well. This is exactly like the way we have on Earth! If we had this, we would have realistic worlds to an even greater extent, and, here's another cool thing... We would be able to send ourselves into orbit!
 
If we were to implement this, I would suggest starting out with a sphere. With that sphere, if it was perfectly spherical, you wuld set the origin of gravity at the center of the sphere, where the distance from the radius of the sphere would be zero.
 
Now, in the laws of gravity, we know that the strength of gravity decreases with distance, that is a well known fact. If you were to be on the surface, you would experience a stronger pull than if you were 2000 meters above the surface. If you managed to stay inside the middle of the sphere, you would just stay there. However, this is a really complicated matter, and essentially, we won't be creating planets, we will just be creating weak black holes in the game, but that's all right, as long as you make sure no object can get a certain distance to the center.
Now, the equation for determining the force between two objects is this:
 
F=G(m1m2)/r^2
 
F is the force. G is the gravitational constant which even I don't know how it was derived, but it is 6.67x10^-11. M1 could be one of the masses that you choose, since the force of gravity is actually the force between two objects. So, let's say that m1 could be the planet, and m2 could be the buggy. The distance is r, so you can say that gravity decreases proportionally with the square of the distance.
 
Now that you know the force, you have to figure out the acceleration. This would require the buggy to have a set mass, and the planet to have a set mass.
 
Once you have the masses, and you know the force, you apply it to the equation F=ma. To figure out the acceleration of the buggy, which is what we would call the gravity of the planet in m/s^2, you divide by m, and then you get the acceleration for that distance.
 
The reason why I ask for the limits of the size of a world is that we want this to be sort of realistic. Sort of large worlds would be nice for spheres, because you want to be able to see a bit down the road, with a horizon that is sort of far off.
 
Well, let's apply this.
 
Let's say we are able to make a world with a radius of about 5000 meters. We want it to resemble the Earth's gravity for normality, and the Earth's gravity is usually around 9.807 m/s^2 at the surface.
 
Now, we have to set a mass for the buggy, so let's say it is 1000 kg, just for the sake of the mathematics.
 
To have an acceleration of 9.807 m/s^2 for the buggy, we use the F=ma equation, and we multiply the mass of the buggy by the acceleration of gravity we want, and if we do that, we get 9807 Newton, or 9807 N. Now, let's plug that into the first equation I gave you,
F=G(m1m2)/r^2
9807=(6.67x10^011)(m1)(1000)/(5000)^2
 
We know everything except for the mass of the planet. We know that is has a radius of 5000 meters, we know that the buggy has a mass of 1000 kg, we know that the gravitational constant, G, or "Big G" is 6.67x10^-11, and we know that the force needed to accelerate the buggy downwards at that rate at that altitude is 9807 N.
 
So, lets solve.
 
9807 times the square of the radius, which is 5000^2, or 25,000,000, is 245,175,000,000, or in scientific notation, 2.45175x10^11.
 
We now have 2.45175x10^11=G(m1)(1000)
 
Divide by 1000, or 10^3, and you get 2.45175x10^8=G(m1)
 
Divide by G, which is 6.67x10^-11, and you get that the mass of m1, or the planet world that we have created with a radius of 5000 meters is approximately 3.676x10^18 kg.
 
Now, I believe what we have here is a very dense planet, lol.
 
I think that the equation for the volume of a sphere is (4���r^2)/3, with ��� being pi, or 3.14159265258... and so on, repeating infinitely many times...
 
So, lets figure out the volume of this sphere!
 
4���(5000^2)/3 is approximately 1.0472x10^8, so we can say that this is that many cubic meters. (3.676x10^18 kg)/(1.0472x10^8 cubic meters) is about 3.51x10^10 kg per cubic meter, or about 35 Billion 100 million kg per cubic meter! That is very very dense, compared with the Earth's average density of 5540 kg per cubic meter!
 
However, all of that talk about the density of this hypothetical planet with the gravitational acceleration of 9.807 m/s^2 at the surface is irrelevant, lol :) I just thought it would be cool to figure out!
 
Now, one of the AWESOME implication of spherical planets with gravity fields is that we can send ourselves into ORBIT!
 
The speed needed to orbit a planet is given by the square root of 2Gm/r, with everything in the square root. This is what we call the escape velocity, or the velocity that you need to stay in perfect orbit. If you go slower than this velocity, then you will hit the planet, at some point in time. If you go faster than the escape velocity, then that is what you will do, escape the reigns of the gravity, and at some speed fly away from the planet. Now, that is not to say that the planet will not have a gravitational effect on you, but you won't be bound to the planet or bound into an orbit.
 
Now, at what speed would we have to be driving on the surface of the planet to go into orbit?
 
Well, we plug what we know into the equation. This means that the square root of 2(6.67x10^-11)(3.676x10^18)/5000=An escape velocity of 313.1074 m/s, or 700.4 mph! So, fi we were to be driving a buggy on the surface, we would need to be going at least 700.4 mph to go in orbit! And, this is possible in Mars 3, with the I/O Settings box.
 
Now, I will go into further detail about how to implement this, but I have just given you world designers and game coders something to chew on... How to implement this?
 
I will write the idea that Flynn has told me in the comments, but I just wanted to submit this, now.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 3:19 GMT
Thank you for the help, Ender!
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 5:58 GMT
WHAT?! You should thank ME. I was the first to send you the fixed version (in PM).
 
-__-
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 2:20 GMT
Yours didn't work
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
15 hours - 1,849v
Posted 2012/12/11 - 5:33 GMT
IDK!
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 1:09 GMT
Hey, I made a little demo of what Mars could possibely look like in the future. This acts as a visual representation of Quantum's Idea.
 
Though I would prefer if you guys did NOT subscribe to me.



» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
2 days - 6,069v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 1:19 GMT
Abister,
 
That looks very nice, but wouldn't you have to rewrite much of the Mars Explorer code? From what I can see from this section of the original JavaScript coding, it seems like Gravity is either "true" or "false", but there is not a "directional gravity" option:
Snippet of Mars Explorer Code
Although that is about Bots, it seems to clearly state that gravity is either "true" or "false", and it does not seem to imply a "directional gravity" option.
 
Sincerely,
Apophis
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 13,880v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 1:22 GMT
Haha. We are fully aware of this, it's kind of the point. : D
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 2:03 GMT
Psst, Apophis. Edit your image and set the style to None so ppl can see the code.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 2:20 GMT
Apophis, the new gravity we're working on no longer uses this. What we've done is completely different, using real programmed gravity–the update is going to be biblical. ^_^
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
2 days - 6,069v
Posted 2012/12/12 - 2:32 GMT
TheCyberMan,
 
Ok, I just wanted to point that out. :)
 
Sincerely,
Apophis
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2012/12/15 - 3:35 GMT
So, will this involve gravity coming from a point, so that on a spherical world, people on both sides of it will be attracted to the world, and then, people could go into orbit around the planet?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/01/09 - 21:18 GMT
Guys, notice the code he posted is commented out?
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
14 hours - 1,473v
Posted 2013/01/05 - 23:13 GMT
Ok, so, I never really told you guys how Flynn suggested it be. He said that instead of a system where the game is constantly calculating the force of gravity whenever you move, we have a system that entails a field that you are in, where there are set gravitational accelerations implemented into it, with distance. If you think of this as a 2 dimensional circle, with the planet as that circle, you would see a ring around it that touches the center or the surface of the planet. I think that may be a bit easier. Or, at least this is what I think may be pretty close to what Flynn told me a while ago, lol.
 
There is also another thing related to this. I have already gotten a bit of help on this, but if you want to inductively and experimentally observe the escape velocity of a perfect spherical planet, you need a buggy that has an jet in the back, like a hovercraft with wheels, or just a buggy simply with a jet in the back. Also, you would have to have the option of turning on either only the wheels, only the jet, or both. The reason for this is that as you drive around a spherical planet at higher and higher speeds, it is like you are climbing up a hill, and your wheels just barely touch the ground when you go over the top of the hill. There is less force between your wheels and the ground, so basically, your buggy is standing way up on its shocks due to the acceleration, with this effect being visible during accelerating from a stop, normally, and you basically lose control.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 31,378v
Posted 2013/01/06 - 0:51 GMT
How the heck did you turn a simple game in to a something that not even NASA knows! Mind me asking what's the point in all of this? It's a little too complicated for almost everyone and not even really explaining much on what's what. Heck it confused me big time.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2013/01/06 - 1:17 GMT
A realistic and easy way to program round worlds.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 31,378v
Posted 2013/01/06 - 2:53 GMT
I call bull crap on that easy way. It's more like Einstein's brain was spilled all over the post! I mean it doesnt even talk about how or which tools to use to make one! Excuse me but I'm not smart enough to make another Uranus...
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2013/01/06 - 3:29 GMT
That's why you didn't make the post ; )

Be thankful, even though you don't understand lol
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/01/09 - 21:24 GMT
Mate, it's some of the simplest laws in physics!!!
 
Okay, it's a little difficult because of the typography. But it's not exactly differentiation and integration.
I'm 14, I understand what he's on about. Maybe you should listen to your science teacher.
And mind your language, there are some younger people on this forum.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
1 week - 32,767v
Posted 2013/01/09 - 21:32 GMT
Like me...
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/01/09 - 21:54 GMT
Three things I want to say:
 
a) there's an easier way than having spherical worlds - Unity's terrain doesn't support odd shapes like that. You could just have a system whereby you move the player instantly when they go past the edge of the terrain - like in Asteroids, the old game. The player would think he's just orbitted the planet, wheras there would be no need for any slow-running physics coding.
 
b) you'd have to also simulate lift properly with L=1/2 p v^2 A Cl, with L being lift, p being air density (could lerp between density at mars sea level and 0...) and v being velocity, A being wing area and Cl being the lift coefficient, which has to include the angle of attack, mach number and reynolds number. In code terms:
liftForce = 0.5*(airDensity*(rigidbody.velocity*rigidbody.velocity)*wingArea*liftCoefficient);
I believe the current version includes a calculation like this.
 
c) is it necessary? Think of all the noobs doing runners off into space!
 
I'd give up on mars if it started getting this complex - statement of fact, not directed at anyone. I just play to log on, have a blast, do a little dogfighting, exploring, chatting, etcetera, then leave feeling good. If you want a simulation, get a Mac and buy XPlane. It has mars as an available world.
 
Please, whoever's devving: don't make it overly complicated!!!
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
23 hours - 2,956v
Posted 2013/01/21 - 14:35 GMT
:')
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
23 hours - 2,065v
Posted 2013/03/04 - 5:56 GMT
Quantum, nice idea, but you are far from the first one to think of that.  I'd love to have earl circular gravity in Mars, but the reason why its not like that already is because one direction gravity is built deeply into mars code (as it is in a lot of games).  Just to add circular gravity, you would need to practically rewrite the entire game, and I'm afraid that flynn has enough work ahead of him already.
 
Also, about the gigantic physics explanation thing, I think that the people who care about that probably already know it.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
6 days - 15,269v
Posted 2013/03/04 - 8:57 GMT
As a matter of fact, flynn did manage it in his apocalypse build. Type "2012" in the custom world url box.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/03/04 - 8:58 GMT
Yeah, well it doesn't work very well. Try flying. You turn all over the place.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
23 hours - 2,065v
Posted 2013/03/06 - 5:16 GMT
Actually it worked better than I expected (I hadn't played it before).  Its interesting that the vehicle tends to align with the built-in down direction (espcially when flying), even when normal gravity is turned off.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
8 hours - 855v
Posted 2013/03/06 - 17:46 GMT
It was waaay too laggy for me.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/03/06 - 17:54 GMT
Hmm... your computer must be slow. Mine gets 120 fps, which is about average for a mesh world... comparable to the Sky King.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
8 hours - 855v
Posted 2013/03/06 - 21:50 GMT
Its not slow, I can play all other maps perfectly fine, it's to do with what is different about it, i.e the physics.
» Reply to Comment
Re: Gravity, and how big can you make a world?
4 days - 9,791v
Posted 2013/03/07 - 9:25 GMT
hmm. Probably due to the CPU rather than the GPU then. If it can't do all the calculations fast enough, then it will appear to lag... IDK. It's a fun map, a shame it's laggy for you.


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